Power Tools

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Power Tools

OSHA 3080 defines a power tool as any tool requiring external electrical, pneumatic, or chemical power to function.


Saws


Bandsaw

Main Article : Bandsaw
Delta band saw.

A bandsaw (also written band saw) is a saw with a long, sharp blade consisting of a continuous band of toothed metal stretched between two or more wheels to cut material. Advantages include uniform cutting action as a result of an evenly distributed tooth load, and the ability to cut irregular or curved shapes like a jigsaw. Additionally since the blade is pulling the material into the table it is unlikely there will be kickback or ricochets. The minimum radius of a curve is determined by the width of the band and its kerf. Most bandsaws have two wheels rotating in the same plane, one of which is powered, although some may have three or four to distribute the load. The blade itself can come in a variety of size and tooth pitch (teeth per inch, or TPI) which enables the machine to be highly versatile and able to cut a wide variety of materials including wood, metal and plastic.


Circular Saw

Main Article : Circular Saw
Circular saw.

A circular saw is a power-saw using a toothed or abrasive disc or blade to cut different materials using a rotary motion spinning around an arbor. A circular saw is a tool for cutting many materials such as wood, masonry, plastic, or metal and may be hand-held or mounted to a machine. In woodworking the term "circular saw" refers specifically to the hand-held type and the table saw and chop saw are other common forms of circular saws. "Skil saw" has become a generic trademark for conventional hand-held circular saws. Circular saw blades are specially designed for each particular material they are intended to cut and in cutting wood are specifically designed for making rip-cuts, cross-cuts, or a combination of both.


Miter Saw

Main Article : Miter Saw
Miter saw.

A power miter saw, also known as a drop saw or chop saw, is a power tool used to make a quick, accurate crosscut in a workpiece at a selected angle. Commonly used for cutting of molding and trim. Most miter saws are relatively small and portable, with common blade sizes ranging from eight to twelve inches. The miter saw makes cuts by pulling a spinning circular saw blade down onto a workpiece in a short, controlled motion. The workpiece is typically held against a fence, which provides a precise cutting angle between the plane of the blade and the plane of the longest workpiece edge. In standard position, this angle is fixed at 90°. A primary distinguishing feature of the miter saw is the miter index that allows the angle of the blade to be changed relative to the fence. While most miter saws enable precise one-degree incremental changes to the miter index, many also provide "stops" that allow the miter index to be quickly set to common angles (such as 15°, 22.5°, 30°, and 45°). Compound-Miter saws add the ability to rotate the blade head at a range of angles from the board allowing you to enter the wood at an angle other than 90 degrees. Creates a ramp angled cut into the side of the wood. Allows for more complex cuts and is commonly used in trim work for homes.


Panel Saw

Main Article : Panel Saw
Panel saw.

The panel saw is any type of circular sawing machine with a sliding table or saw blade that crosscuts sheets into sized parts. The Idea Shop panel saw is a vertical unit with a sliding saw blade. This is especially useful for cutting down large standard 4' x 8' sheets of plywood, melamine, acrylic or cardboard. The saw normally operates in the vertical cutting direction, however the blade can be rotated to rip long steps from sheet material. Many circular saw blades are available to cut a variety of materials from wood to metals. Because of guards the panel saw is a much safer alternative to the table saw for making straight cuts, especially on large stock materials. The size of the stock normally requires two poeple to load the material safely into the machine.


Drills


Cordless Drill

Main Article :Cordless Drill
Cordless Drill


Drill Press

Main Article :Drill Press
Drill press.

Drilling machines, or drill presses, are primarily used to drill or enlarge a cylindrical hole in a workpiece or part. The chief operation performed on the drill press is drilling, but other possible operations include: reaming, countersinking, counterboring, and tapping.


Sanders / Grinders


Belt/Disc Sander

Main Article : Sanders
Manual Belt sander.
Manual Orbital sander.


Instructional Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_H9cGyL3BoY



Bench Grinder

Main Article : Bench Grinder
Bench grinder.

A bench grinder is a benchtop type of grinding machine used to drive abrasive wheels. A pedestal grinder is a similar or larger version of grinder that is mounted on a pedestal, which may be bolted to the floor or may sit on rubber feet. These types of grinders are commonly used to hand grind various cutting tools and perform other rough grinding. Depending on the bond and grade of the grinding wheel, it may be used for sharpening cutting tools such as tool bits, drill bits, chisels, and gouges. Alternatively, it may be used to roughly shape metal prior to welding or fitting. A wire brush wheel or buffing wheels can be interchanged with the grinding wheels in order to clean or polish workpieces. Stiff buffing wheels can also be used when deburring is the task at hand. Some buffing machines (buffers) are built on the same concept as bench grinders except for longer housings and arbors with buffing wheels instead of grinding wheels.



Lathes


Wood Lathe

Main Article : Wood Lathe
Woodworking lathe.

A machine for shaping a piece of material, such as wood or metal, by rotating it rapidly along its axis while pressing a fixed cutting or abrading tool against it -->