Difference between revisions of "Arduino"

From Idea Shop Wiki
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== About ==
 
== About ==
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Arduino is an open-source electronics platform based on easy-to-use hardware and software. Arduino boards are able to read inputs - light on a sensor, a finger on a button, or a Twitter message - and turn it into an output - activating a motor, turning on an LED, publishing something online. You can tell your board what to do by sending a set of instructions to the microcontroller on the board. To do so you use the Arduino programming language (based on Wiring), and the Arduino Software (IDE), based on Processing. [https://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Introduction Source]
 
Arduino is an open-source electronics platform based on easy-to-use hardware and software. Arduino boards are able to read inputs - light on a sensor, a finger on a button, or a Twitter message - and turn it into an output - activating a motor, turning on an LED, publishing something online. You can tell your board what to do by sending a set of instructions to the microcontroller on the board. To do so you use the Arduino programming language (based on Wiring), and the Arduino Software (IDE), based on Processing. [https://www.arduino.cc/en/Guide/Introduction Source]
  
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== Uses of Arduino ==
 
== Uses of Arduino ==
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<!--Examples of projects-->
 
<!--Examples of projects-->
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Here is a Lab Manual intended to provide a basic introduction to Arduino and the concepts we use here at the Idea Shop.  This lab manual was created for people with basic programming knowledge, but no Arduino experience.  The topics covered are; digital input and output, operating servos, and Serial communication.
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This lab manual may not answer all the questions you have about a topic, but many of the challenges include reference links.  Don’t forget; you can always ask the lab mentors for help.
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===Challenge 1: Blink an LED===
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If you’ve done this before feel free to continue to the next challenge.
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====Hardware Required====
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&emsp;-Arduino Uno<br>
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&emsp;-LED<br>
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&emsp;-220 Ohm Resistor (Red-Red-Brown-Gold color bands)<br>
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&emsp;-USB-A Cord<br>
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&emsp;-Computer with Arduino program installed<br>
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====Instructions====
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This challenge is simple, use an Arduino Uno to blink an LED on and off.  An LED is an electronic component that emits light when it’s fed power.  However, this component can only be connected to a circuit one way, in other words it only allows current to flow in one direction, which makes it a diode.  This is how we derived the name LED, or Light Emitting Diode. 
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Before we try to make the LED blink, let’s test our circuit on a breadboard.  A breadboard is a device that allows us to test our circuits easily by inserting/removing wire connections and components easily.

Revision as of 14:57, 22 April 2020

About


Arduino is an open-source electronics platform based on easy-to-use hardware and software. Arduino boards are able to read inputs - light on a sensor, a finger on a button, or a Twitter message - and turn it into an output - activating a motor, turning on an LED, publishing something online. You can tell your board what to do by sending a set of instructions to the microcontroller on the board. To do so you use the Arduino programming language (based on Wiring), and the Arduino Software (IDE), based on Processing. Source

The company manufactures single board micro-controllers and micro-controller kits for building digital devices and interactive objects that can sense and control objects in the physical world.

Here is a Video Tutorial for an Introduction to Arduino

Hardware components

Software components

Uses of Arduino


Here is a Lab Manual intended to provide a basic introduction to Arduino and the concepts we use here at the Idea Shop. This lab manual was created for people with basic programming knowledge, but no Arduino experience. The topics covered are; digital input and output, operating servos, and Serial communication.

This lab manual may not answer all the questions you have about a topic, but many of the challenges include reference links. Don’t forget; you can always ask the lab mentors for help.

Challenge 1: Blink an LED

If you’ve done this before feel free to continue to the next challenge.

Hardware Required

 -Arduino Uno
 -LED
 -220 Ohm Resistor (Red-Red-Brown-Gold color bands)
 -USB-A Cord
 -Computer with Arduino program installed

Instructions

This challenge is simple, use an Arduino Uno to blink an LED on and off. An LED is an electronic component that emits light when it’s fed power. However, this component can only be connected to a circuit one way, in other words it only allows current to flow in one direction, which makes it a diode. This is how we derived the name LED, or Light Emitting Diode.

Before we try to make the LED blink, let’s test our circuit on a breadboard. A breadboard is a device that allows us to test our circuits easily by inserting/removing wire connections and components easily.